Savannah, Georgia

January 8th, 2011 | Posted by Steve in Georgia | Lighhouses | Museums

Nothing too great yet.  As time goes by I’ll try some of these in B&W to see if they improve.

The first is the Tybee Island, GA Light.  A lot of information about this place can be found here.

I climbed to the lower catwalk of the lighthouse in this photo, some 175+ stairs.  It was a good cardio workout.  The wind was blowing some 30 mph outside at the top so I felt very uncomfortable there.

The interior had a cast iron spiral staircase coming out of the center pole with each stair extending to the interior wall.  Unfortunately this killed any type of interior vertical view.   The lighthouse keepers cottage is on the right.  The 2nd Assistant Light keepers quarters are on the left.

For you photo nuts everything is shot on a Canon 5D Mark II with a 24-105 f4 zoom lens.  I brought no other lenses on this trip.  All ISO ratings are 200.  I find little or no electronic noise at 200 and it buys 2 stops over the ISO 50 films I used with the film cameras.  I would be interested in any opinions on shooting electronically at ISO 200.

Non flash shots are in Aperture Priority mode.  Metering is usually center weighted average, but can also be partial.   I usually find either of these to be better than the evaluative mode.  I use spot metering on rare occasion.

I am using a Canon Speedlite 430EX II.  Any flash photos are at 1/60th of a second which is the camera standard.  I shoot flash in Program mode, and I have the camera set to back the flash off 1/3 of a stop.

This is shot with a circular polarizer, f10, 1/100th second.  Focal length is 32mm on the zoom lens.  The wide angle necessary for the view explains the darkening of the sky by the polarizer [to the right] as the view goes farther & farther from the sun [out of the frame on the left].  I straightened the verticals a little.  I had to shoot it on my knees to avoid the cell tower that would have otherwise appeared in the background next to the lighthouse.  The lower viewpoint also adds to the composition.

This is shot in about the same direction as the shot from outside of the catwalk shown below.

The whites probably need a little warming up.  It is what I call a good “post card” shot.

Lighthouse - Tybee, Georgia

Lighthouse - Tybee, Georgia

 

This inside at the top of the stairs.  It is as close as the public can get to the light itself.  It is apparently a first order Fresnel lens which, if I understand Fresnel lighthouse lenses, is as large as they get.  The view made for an interesting design with interesting colors.  There are 2 lamps.  The further of the two is lit.  Each is a 1000 watt quartz lamp.  This is shot at  28mm on the zoom lens, f 10, 1/160th of a second.  It is 1/3 stop underexposed if you believe the meter.  It would have made for a great fisheye, but I left the fisheye at home.

Tybee Fresnel Lens

Tybee Fresnel Lens

Looking NW from the catwalk outside & below the light.  This is just a record shot so you can see I really was crazy enough to go outside.  That might be Savannah peeking over the horizon at the left center of the frame. I didn’t really care to get my bearings up there.  You can see the cell tower next to the water tower I mentioned earlier.

From this point part of the town of Tybee ends not too far out of the frame on the left with the bridge going back to the mainland.  Behind me the town stretches for another 2-3 miles.  It is well built and is apparently a popular resort.

The town of has a real racket going.  Without a pass there is almost no where to park.  The enforcement is 8am – 8 pm 7 days a week.  I got directions to the lighthouse from the parking cop.  I interrupted him while he was filling out a ticket.

Tybee, Georgia Looking Northwest

Tybee, Georgia Looking Northwest

This is part of the restored kitchen in the Light keepers cottage.  The interior is restored and all the antiques were added at the restoration around 2000.  It is roughly period accurate to the 1920′s or 1930′s.  Only one of the original appliances remains, but not shown here.  The house was a wreck by the 1970′s and was apparently saved from demolition.

This is shot with the flash, 1/60th of a second, f 45 (that is what the computer read out said, but I don’t believe it), 28mm focal length.  The room is lit by hanging lamps which appear period accurate, but instead of incandescents they have twisted fluorescent tubular bulbs (Fran calls them “snot bulbs”).

Old Kitchen at Tybee

Old Kitchen at Tybee

This is the Gingerbread House in the historic residential district of Savannah.  It is not very good, but rather is shown as an unusual place.  This part of the neighborhood was not very good at all so I took a few grab shots and got out of there real quick.  The house is starting to deteriorate on the outside.  It needs a paint job at least.

No photo info here.  I’m not proud of this although it may yet translate into B&W.  If it makes a good B&W you may see it again.

Gingerbread House Savannah

Gingerbread House Savannah

This is Magnolia Hall in a better part of the historic district.  It is a guest house for the Savannah College of Art and Design.  I used the flash for some fill light.  I had to be standing in the street and even then I didn’t have a wide enough lens.  I would shoot a few then step onto the curb to avoid the traffic.  Street parking is around the block so the cars come buzzing by the curb at 30-40.

This is another B&W candidate.  Because it was so dark it was shot at f 4, the widest opening on the lens.  With the lens at 24mm I wasn’t worried at all about the depth of field.

Magnolia Hall, Savannah

Magnolia Hall, Savannah

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